The end of a marriage is an emotional time. When you know that the marriage is finished, you’ll probably want to file for divorce. There are specific requirements that you have to meet in Texas if you’re going to file for divorce.

One of the primary requirements is that you or your spouse have lived in Texas for six months prior to the filing date. You also must have been a resident in the county in which you’re filing for at least 90 days. There aren’t any work-arounds for these time limits, so be sure to factor this in if you’re planning a move.

Texas has a waiting period that starts the day you file the petition. Your divorce can’t be finalized until 60 days after the petition was filed. You’ll have to wait even longer if you’re planning on getting married again. There is a 30-day waiting period that must pass from the finalization of the divorce until you remarry. However, it is possible for the court to waive that time.

The standard for divorcing in Texas is that the marital strife is too great for the marriage to continue, no matter what either party tries. That is a no-fault grounds for divorce, but a person can also file if they’ve been abandoned for a year by their spouse. Adultery, conviction of a felony that comes with one year of imprisonment, violence and cruelty are other grounds for a divorce in Texas.

If you’re considering divorce or find out that your ex has already filed for one, you should take steps to protect your interests. This includes while you’re going through the property division and child custody matters — if applicable.