To be in the military, you must be committed. This is not an easy lifestyle. It takes work and sacrifice, and that applies even to those who never see combat. It’s simply a more difficult lifestyle, especially for a family, than most other careers provide.

For instance, experts point out that many families move at least once every 24-36 months. This means that they have about two years to settle in and get used to the area before moving again. Children have limited time to make friends. Once they reach school age, they are the new kid in class every two or three years.

When you compare all of that to the traditional family living in a suburb, with the kids attending the same schools from kindergarten to senior year, it’s easy to see how difficult it can be.

Deployments only make this more drastic. One spouse may spend anywhere from six to 18 months overseas. They can still communicate with their family, but the times are limited and it’s not in-person  communication. Parents can really feel cut off. If they have young children, they may feel like they’re missing watching them grow up.

All of this can really take a toll on a marriage. Is it any surprise that military couples may wind up deciding they need to divorce? They feel like they can deal with this lifestyle at the beginning, but it becomes clear over time that this isn’t going to work. Those who do decide to get divorced could face some additional challenges, so it is important for them to know exactly what legal rights they have in a military divorce.